Microsoft Outlook - Send An Email To Undisclosed Recipients


If you want to send an email to a group of people but keep their email addresses hidden, send it to "Undisclosed recipients" in Outlook.


What to Know


  • Create a new contact in the address book and enter Undisclosed Recipients in the Full Name box. Enter your email in the Email field.
  • Compose an email and add Undisclosed Recipients to the To field. Enter additional email addresses in the Bcc field.

This article explains how to create an Undisclosed Recipients contact in Outlook so you can send an email and keep everyone's addresses private. Instructions apply to Outlook 2019, 2016, 2013, 2010, 2007; and Outlook for Microsoft 365.


How to Create an Undisclosed Recipients Contact


To create a contact that appears in the To field of an email message and hides the recipients' contact information, open Outlook and follow these instructions:


  1. Go to the Home tab and, in the Find group, select Address Book
  2. Select File > New Entry
  3. In the New Entry dialog box, select New Contact
  4. Select OK
  5. In the Full Name text box, enter Undisclosed Recipients
  6. In the Email text box, enter your email address
  7. Select Save & Close

    • Note: If you have an existing address book entry that uses your email address, the Duplicate Contact Detected dialog box appears. Select Add new contact, then choose Add.

  8. Close the Address Book

How to Send an Email to Undisclosed Recipients in Outlook


Here's how to send an email using the undisclosed recipients contact:


  1. Create a new email message in Outlook
  2. In the To field, enter Undisclosed Recipients. As you type, Outlook displays a list of suggestions. Choose the undisclosed recipient contact
  3. Select Bcc

    • Note: If you don't see the Bcc button, go to Options and select Bcc.

  4. Highlight the addresses you want to email and select Bcc. If you type these addresses manually, separate each address with a semicolon
  5. Select OK
  6. Compose the message
  7. Select Send

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